Detect if you are Running a Virtual Machine

May 13, 2010 | By

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virt-what

virt-what is a shell script maintained by Red Hat that does the same thing. It prints more details about the VM than imvirt if a VM was found. Otherwise it exits with code 0 (no error) and does not print anything.

To download it visit virt-what

imvirt

imvirt was developed in Perl by Thomas Liske. It does its job by looking for wellknown boot messages, directories and reading DMI (Desktop Management Interface) data. It prints one line. These are the tool’s outputs and what they mean:

  • HVM: – signature of an unknown hypervisor
  • VirtualBox – VirtualBox
  • Virtual Machine – Microsoft Virtual PC/Virtual Server
  • VMware – VMware Virtual Platform
  • VMware (Express|ESX Server|GSX Server|Workstation) – VMware Virtual Platform
  • OpenVZ – OpenVZ/Virtuosso
  • Physical – This is a physical machine or a not detected container.
  • QEMU – QEMU/KVM (based)
  • UML – User Mode Linux
  • Xen – Xen hypervisor
  • Xen 3.x (PV|HVM) – Xen hypervisor

To download it visit imvirt’s SourceForge page.

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